claim the moral high ground

claim the moral high ground
take, claim, seize, etc. the moral ˈhigh ground idiom
to claim that your side of an argument is morally better than your opponents' side; to argue in a way that makes your side seem morally better
Main entry:moralidiom

Useful english dictionary. 2012.

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  • take the moral high ground — take, claim, seize, etc. the moral ˈhigh ground idiom to claim that your side of an argument is morally better than your opponents side; to argue in a way that makes your side seem morally better Main entry: ↑moralidiom …   Useful english dictionary

  • seize the moral high ground — take, claim, seize, etc. the moral ˈhigh ground idiom to claim that your side of an argument is morally better than your opponents side; to argue in a way that makes your side seem morally better Main entry: ↑moralidiom …   Useful english dictionary

  • moral high ground — If people have/take/claim/seize, etc, the moral high ground, they claim that their arguments, beliefs, etc, are morally superior to those being put forward by other people …   The small dictionary of idiomes

  • moral high ground —    If people have/take/claim/seize, etc, the moral high ground, they claim that their arguments, beliefs, etc, are morally superior to those being put forward by other people.   (Dorking School Dictionary) …   English Idioms & idiomatic expressions

  • the high ground — a position in which you have an advantage over others They claim to have the (intellectual) high ground in this debate. [=they claim to have the (intellectually) better position] often used in the phase the moral high ground These countries lost …   Useful english dictionary

  • high — high1 W1S1 [haı] adj comparative higher superlative highest ↑high, ↑low ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(from bottom to top)¦ 2¦(above ground)¦ 3¦(large number)¦ 4¦(good standard)¦ 5¦(containing a lot)¦ 6¦(rank/position)¦ …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • moral — mor|al1 W2S3 [ˈmɔrəl US ˈmo: ] adj [Date: 1300 1400; : Latin; Origin: moralis, from mos what people usually or traditionally do ] 1.) [only before noun] relating to the principles of what is right and wrong behaviour, and with the difference… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Moral hazard — In economic theory, moral hazard is a situation in which a party insulated from risk behaves differently from how it would behave if it were fully exposed to the risk. Moral hazard arises because an individual or institution does not take the… …   Wikipedia

  • The Church —     The Church     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► The Church     The term church (Anglo Saxon, cirice, circe; Modern German, Kirche; Sw., Kyrka) is the name employed in the Teutonic languages to render the Greek ekklesia (ecclesia), the term by which… …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • The Seal of Confession —     The Law of the Seal of Confession     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► The Law of the Seal of Confession     In the Decretum of the Gratian who compiled the edicts of previous councils and the principles of Church law which he published about 1151,… …   Catholic encyclopedia

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